Nuclear Physics and Atomic Energy


Nuclear Physics and Atomic Energy

  ISSN: 1818-331X (Print), 2074-0565 (Online)
  Publisher: Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine
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Nucl. Phys. At. Energy 2018, volume 19, issue 2, pages 190-195.
Section: Engineering and Methods of Experiment.
Received: 26.02.2018; Accepted: 18.06.2018; Published online: 02.08.2018.
PDF Full text (en)
https://doi.org/10.15407/jnpae2018.02.190

Measurement of indoor radon concentration in district Mardan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Sohail Ahmad1, Muhammad Ajaz1,*, Yasir Ali2, Hannan Younis2, Kamal Hussain Khan3, Uzma Tabassum2

1 Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan, Pakistan
2 Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan
3 Department of Physics, Women University of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Bagh, Pakistan


*Corresponding author. E-mail address: ajaz@awkum.edu.pk

Abstract: The study of the indoor radon concentration in district Mardan Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), Pakistan is presented. To know the impact of the dose for Mardan city, 40 CR-39 detectors were installed in different houses for a period of three months. The radon concentration for this phase of the year (early summer) is from 18.45 ± 0.53 to 41.51 ± 3.4 Bq/m3. The level of indoor radon concentration is the highest in the basements i.e. 41.51 ± 3.4 Bq/m3 which is within acceptable limit (148 Bq/m3), recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency. The annual effective dose calculated from this study is ERn = 0.704 mSv. It was concluded that indoor radon concentration may not suppose any severe threat to the health of residents.

Keywords: radiation measurements, indoor radon, SSNTDs.

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